Tag Archives: Cultural

Utah Cultural Celebration Center

Utah Cultural Celebration Center - West Valley City, Utah, Art Gallery, Live Music Venue, Performing Art Center, Concerts

The Utah Cultural Celebration Center is dedicated to enriching and strengthening communities by promoting the expression of the arts, education, opportunities for economic development and the celebration of human diversity.

The center is committed to:

  • The preservation and perpetuation of cultural traditions
  • Creating a setting for cultural exchange and experience
  • Promoting the visual and performing arts as well as the humanities
  • Encouraging education through creative thinking and experiential learning
  • Enhancing opportunities for economic development
  • Providing a social infrastructure for networking within the community
  • Establishing a ‘home’ for diverse artistic achievement.

The Center is designed to strengthen a sense of unity among the people of the Wasatch Front by highlighting cultural wealth and creativity and offering a forum to celebrate our residents’ talents in music, dance, performance and visual arts. We work to provide a place where family and friends can come together, and where cultural arts are nurtured, promoted, and celebrated.

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Utah Center for Arts

The Utah Center for Arts is located at 2191 South 300 West. The Center hosts art exhibits from renowned and emerging artists with over 9000 sq ft. of exhibition space. The UAA (Utah Arts Alliance) also hosts poetry readings, independent film screenings, live music, dance performances, plays and more.

Programs at the center include:

  • The Center Gallery with monthly exhibitions.
  • Artist Studios for Photographers, Painters, Sculptors, Musicians and Actors.
  • Salt Lake Capoeira, Brazilian Martial Arts and Cultural Organization.
  • SLC Photo Club, the UAA’s free group for photographers.
  • Rubaiyat Dance Company.
  • Mothermoon Expressive Therapy.
  • Musicgarage.org The UAA’s music performance program for youth and adults.
  • Salsa Dancing Classes.
  • Slam Poetry Events.
  • Incendiary Circus, Fire Dancing Group, with free lessons bi-weekly.
  • Modern Dance and Movement classes for adults and kids.
  • The Center Stage, hosts productions from community and touring theater groups
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Flamenco

Flamenco is a style of music and dance which is native to several regions of southern Spain.

Flamenco Dancing, Dancers, Spain, Latin Dancing, Dance Lessons, Learn to Dance, Ballroom Along with its Romani origins, Spanish, Byzantine, Sephardic and Moorish elements have often been cited as influences in the development of flamenco. It has frequently been asserted that these influences coalesced near the end of the reconquista, in the 15th century. The origins of the word flamenco are unclear. It was not recorded until the late 18th century.

Flamenco is popularly depicted as being the music of Andulusian gitanos (gypsies) but historically its roots are in mainstream Andalusian society, in the latter half of the 18th century. Other regions, notably Extremadura and Murcia, have also contributed to the development of flamenco, and many flamenco artists have been born outside the gitano community. Latin American and especially Cuban influences have also contributed, as evidenced in the dances of “Ida y Vuelta”.

On November 16, 2010, UNESCO declared Flamenco one of the Masterpieces of the Oral and Intangible Heritage of Humanity.

Flamenco Today

Traditional flamenco artists never received any formal training: they learned by listening and watching relatives, friends and neighbors. Some artists are still self-taught, but nowadays, it is more usual for dancers and guitarists (and sometimes even singers) to be professionally trained. Some guitarists can even read music and study others styles like classical guitar or jazz, and many dancers take courses in contemporary dance or ballet as well as flamenco.

Flamenco occurs in three settings – the traditional juerga, in small-scale cabaret or concert venues and in the theatre.

The juerga is an informal, spontaneous gitano gathering (rather like a jazz “jam session”). This can include dancing, singing, palmas (hand clapping), or simply pounding in rhythm on an old orange crate or a table. Flamenco, in this context, is organic and dynamic: it adapts to the local talent, instrumentation, and mood of the audience. This context invites comparison with that other creation of a dispossessed class, the blues. Flamenco has been referred to as The Gypsy Blues, or even the European Blues as a means of providing a frame of reference to those new to the genre.

One tradition remains firmly in place: the cantaores(singers) are the heart and soul of the performance. A Peña Flamenca is a meeting place or grouping of Flamenco musicians or artists. There are also “tablaos”, establishments that developed during the 1960s throughout Spain replacing the “café cantante”. The tablaos may have their own company of performers for each show. Many internationally renowned artists have started their careers in “tablaos flamencos”, like the famous singer Miguel Poveda who began in El Cordobés, Barcelona.

The professional concert is more formal. A traditional singing performance has only a singer and one guitar, while a dance concert usually includes two or three guitars, one or more singers (singing in turns, as flamenco cantaors sing solo), and one or more dancers. One of the singers may play the cajon if there is no dedicated cajon player, and all performers will play palmas even if there are dedicated palmeros. The so-called Nuevo Flamenco New flamenco may include flutes or saxophones, piano or other keyboards, or even the bass guitar and the electric guitar. Camarón de la Isla was one artist who popularized this style. All text is available under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License – Wikipedia

Finally there is the theatrical presentation of flamenco, which uses flamenco technique and music but is closer in presentation to a ballet performance.

Related Links & Information

Highland Dancing

Highland | Scottish | Celtic | Irish

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Dance Schools

Crawford School of Irish Dance Salt Lake City

Crawford School of Irish Dance Clearfield

Dance Companies

Crawford School of Irish Dance

Musicians

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The term Highland dance or Highland dancing is used today to refer to a style of athletic solo dancing which developed in the Gaelic Highlands of Scotland. Highland dance evolved into its current form during the nineteenth and twentieth centuries in the context of competitions at public events (namely Highland games), where it is often performed to the accompaniment of Highland bagpipe music. Highland dancers wear specialized shoes called ghillies.

Highland dance has been subject to many influences from outside the Highlands. For example, it has been heavily influenced by the urban aesthetics of the patrons and judges of dance competitions since the nineteenth century. All text is available under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License – Wikipedia

Trees of Diversity Exhibit

For seven years the Utah Cultural Celebration Center has featured a holiday tree exhibit that overflows from the Celebration Gallery, and throughout the entire facility. Each year the number of groups involved, including arts, cultural, non-profit and commercial, has grown and grown. The purpose of this exhibit is to bring the community together in the celebration of various holiday traditions not only from different countries but from different religious backgrounds and various family or community traditions. The tree is used as a sign of friendship and is used to display the art and artifacts representing the richness of our community traditions.Trees of Diversity, Utah Cultural Celebration Center, West Valley Utah

This year the Trees of Diversity exhibition will have over 25 trees and holiday scenes created by various community and ethnic groups. Included are Amish, Honduran, American Indian, Chilean, Peruvian and other South American countries, Mexico, Japan, Canada, Africa, Hawaii, Scotland and others. The Cultural Center will also be displaying artifacts and other historical items from around the world, along with art pieces, nativities, nutcrackers, gingerbread houses, special holiday “store window” scenes, sculptures and wreaths. Two special displays will highlight holiday traditions in both the Jewish and Muslim communities, and the 100+ Dolls from Around the World collection will once again be on display.

Helping kick off the exhibit is SongFest! a night of musical entertainment for everyone. Scheduled to perform are Christmas Bell Ringers, The Beehive Statesmen, The Salt Lake Men’s Choir and the West Valley Symphony. The magical sights and sounds of the holidays are sure to get the whole family ready to celebrate this special time of year, and to learn about other holiday traditions from around the world.

Salt Lake Greek Festival

Greek Festival, Salt Lake City, Utah, Dancing, Music, Food, Family, EntertainmentCome experience authentic foods, and exciting entertainment at Salt Lake City’s annual Greek Festival. The lively event often attracts up to 50,000 attendees and also features art displays and both 5K and 10K runs.

OPA!! Welcome to the Greek Festival. Here you will witness a variety of traditional Greek folk dances performed by our dance groups. The suite of dances will consist of Pan-Hellenic dances (danced throughout Greece with regional variances) and dances from the mainland and islands.

The most popular form of the Greek folk dance is the open circle, with regular handhold position, moving counter-clockwise. Next is the straight line with arms on shoulders of adjacent dancers. The third form is the curved-line dance with the basket-weave hold.

1st Week of September

Tribal Rhythms: Drumming Lessons

Tribal Rhythms, Drum Lessons, Drumming, Ogden, Utah, Eccles Community CenterExplore the basics of drumming. Traditional African rhythms and djembe techniques will be taught. We will have a facilitated drum circle, so you can get playing and have fun!

High-quality African drums (djembes) and instruments will be supplied for class use. Or you may bring your own to play.

Instructor: Déjà Mitchell

Beginning
Session I (six weeks): August 29th – October 17, 2011  Mondays 4-5 p.m.
Ages: 8 through Adult
Tuition/session:$42 members, $45 nonmembers.

Meeting of the Tribes

Jason and Ar-Ar Belly Dancing, Salt Lake city, Meeting of the Tribes, Masonic TempleBelly Dancers Showcase Shimmies at Masonic Temple April 23, 2011

There is no shortage of chances to see belly dance performances in this valley, with the large number of belly dancing groups, classes and associations available. But the Meeting of the Tribes is one the biggest belly-dancing performance of the year, encompassing “tribes” throughout the state in an extravaganza, Saturday, April 23, of more than three hours at the Masonic Temple Auditorium, 650 East South Temple, 1-4:30 pm.

Performers include Juana Ghani Gypsy band, Moroccan Winds, Isis, Christopher, & Katherine, Perizada,Troupe Tarab, Oryantal Dansi, Belly Dancing By Thia, Scimitar, Sahara Dreams, Amaya Saltana, Gypsy Flame, Sight of Water Dance Studio, Celeste and Amura.

Admission is $7 at the door.

  • Masonic Temple
    650 East South Temple Salt Lake City, UT 84102 (801) 363-2936