Tag Archives: Dance Performances

Salsa Dance Lessons & Shows

DF Salsa Socials are held every other Friday at DF Dance Studio and are a treat if you are looking for some Authentic Latin Dancing in Salt Lake City.

Salsa Dance Lessons, Dancing & Shows at DF Dance Studio, Salt Lake City, Utah, Latin Dancing, Singles, Couples, Dating IdeasThere is always a beginner salsa or bachata class to start off the night & Dance Shows & Competitions during the night. But the real secret of these parties lies in the ATMOSPHERE of the studio & people who attend it.

BYOP (bring your own partner) rule doesn’t apply here! Everyone dances with everyone. If you live in SLC and haven’t been to these socials – you are missing out! Come take a class, & dance with us.
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Everyone is welcome, so come take a class with us and bring your friends!

Salsa, Bachata and Reggaeton dancing  on two dance floors with Dance Performances throughout the night to 1:30am!  We also provide a roaming photographer so look your best!

Beginning Salsa Class  9:15 pm

$8 per person (Alcohol available for purchase)

Check out Pics from previous DF salsa socials & get Facebook invites on our “Salsa Socials on Fridays at DF Dance Studio” Facebook group!

Salsa and Ballroom Dance Lessons at DF Dance Studio all year round!

  • Beginning Salsa – Mondays @ 7pm & Saturdays @ 2pm
  • Beginning Salsa for Couples only – Tuesdays @ 7pm
  • Beginning Bachata – Wednesdays @ 8pm
  • Beginning Salsa Casino Rueda – Wednesdays @ 7pm
  • Beginning Social Ballroom – Thursdays @ 7pm
  • Beginning Swing – Thursdays @ 8:30pm

All classes are $60/6 week session. No partner is required & Lots of fun guaranteed!

Hayes Christensen Theatre

Hayes Christensen Theatre - University of Utah Marriott Center of Dance, Salt Lake City, Utah, Modern Dance Venue, Performance, Ballet, Concert HallThe formal performance space in the Marriott Center for Dance, The Hayes Christensen Theatre, was named in honor of Elizabeth R. Hayes and William Christensen, in recognition of their outstanding contributions to dance and the University of Utah.

The 333-seat professional theatre, shared by the Departments of Modern Dance and Ballet, has 14 rows of seating steeply raked to permit all audience members an excellent view. On stage left is a quick change room, restroom, and a ballet barre with an electric-radiant panel to warm dancers’ legs and feet.

Our versatile yet intimate theatre can accommodate a wide-variety of live and unique performances. There’s not a bad seat in the house.

The Hayes Christensen Theatre has hosted lectures, conventions, lunch meetings, auditions, rehearsals, concerts, and live events to name a few. In addition to the Theatre, The Marriott Center for Dance has space and studios to accommodate every activity.

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Driving directions to the Department of Modern Dance, University of Utah: Enter Campus at 500 S and Guardsman Way (1580 E). Follow the round-about on S. Campus Drive west to the stop light at 1500 E. Turn right on 1500 E. The road will dead end in to the visitors pay parking lot. The Marriott Center for Dance building is on the west side of the parking lot.

Kingsbury Hall Ticket office Phone 801-581-7100 Hours 10:00 am – 5:00 pm, Monday – Friday 10:00 am – 2:00 pm, Saturday

Pirate Festival & Renaissance Faire

Pirate, Renaissance, Fair, Festival, Music, Entertainment, Live, Willard Bay, Utah

History and Fantasy unite every year in May at the Utah Renaissance Festival and Fantasy Faire in Marriott-Slaterville only 30 minutes from north Salt Lake City.

Here time stands still as myth and legend collide in a fanciful display of the Renaissance period interspersed with eccentric and whimsical elements of a time that never truly was.

As you step through the gates into Hawkhurst Village, Fairies float by on gossamer wings, Gypsies belly dance to the beat of a rhythmic drum, Pirates fiercely guard their treasures, Mermaids splash playfully in their own pool of water, Magicians perform amazing illusions, and in the distance you can see the Knights of Honor preparing for their jousting tournament that is to be presided over by the Royal Court and King Henry VIII. You’ll also have the chance to wander through the Guild Encampment where you can visit with the Romans and Azure Rose.

1st & 2nd Week of May

Tattoo Convention

Tattoo Convention, Salt Lake City, Utah, Salt Palace, Art, Fashion, Drawing, Illustration, Children's Activities, Belly dancing, Gypsy, Workshops

The Salt Lake City Tattoo Convention continues to feature a select group of world-class artists showcasing a variety of styles and techniques.

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2013 March 22-24
Exhibit Hall 5

2011 February
Salt Palace Convention Center 100 S West Temple
Salt Lake City, UT 84101  (801) 534-4777

Flamenco

Flamenco is a style of music and dance which is native to several regions of southern Spain.

Flamenco Dancing, Dancers, Spain, Latin Dancing, Dance Lessons, Learn to Dance, Ballroom Along with its Romani origins, Spanish, Byzantine, Sephardic and Moorish elements have often been cited as influences in the development of flamenco. It has frequently been asserted that these influences coalesced near the end of the reconquista, in the 15th century. The origins of the word flamenco are unclear. It was not recorded until the late 18th century.

Flamenco is popularly depicted as being the music of Andulusian gitanos (gypsies) but historically its roots are in mainstream Andalusian society, in the latter half of the 18th century. Other regions, notably Extremadura and Murcia, have also contributed to the development of flamenco, and many flamenco artists have been born outside the gitano community. Latin American and especially Cuban influences have also contributed, as evidenced in the dances of “Ida y Vuelta”.

On November 16, 2010, UNESCO declared Flamenco one of the Masterpieces of the Oral and Intangible Heritage of Humanity.

Flamenco Today

Traditional flamenco artists never received any formal training: they learned by listening and watching relatives, friends and neighbors. Some artists are still self-taught, but nowadays, it is more usual for dancers and guitarists (and sometimes even singers) to be professionally trained. Some guitarists can even read music and study others styles like classical guitar or jazz, and many dancers take courses in contemporary dance or ballet as well as flamenco.

Flamenco occurs in three settings – the traditional juerga, in small-scale cabaret or concert venues and in the theatre.

The juerga is an informal, spontaneous gitano gathering (rather like a jazz “jam session”). This can include dancing, singing, palmas (hand clapping), or simply pounding in rhythm on an old orange crate or a table. Flamenco, in this context, is organic and dynamic: it adapts to the local talent, instrumentation, and mood of the audience. This context invites comparison with that other creation of a dispossessed class, the blues. Flamenco has been referred to as The Gypsy Blues, or even the European Blues as a means of providing a frame of reference to those new to the genre.

One tradition remains firmly in place: the cantaores(singers) are the heart and soul of the performance. A Peña Flamenca is a meeting place or grouping of Flamenco musicians or artists. There are also “tablaos”, establishments that developed during the 1960s throughout Spain replacing the “café cantante”. The tablaos may have their own company of performers for each show. Many internationally renowned artists have started their careers in “tablaos flamencos”, like the famous singer Miguel Poveda who began in El Cordobés, Barcelona.

The professional concert is more formal. A traditional singing performance has only a singer and one guitar, while a dance concert usually includes two or three guitars, one or more singers (singing in turns, as flamenco cantaors sing solo), and one or more dancers. One of the singers may play the cajon if there is no dedicated cajon player, and all performers will play palmas even if there are dedicated palmeros. The so-called Nuevo Flamenco New flamenco may include flutes or saxophones, piano or other keyboards, or even the bass guitar and the electric guitar. Camarón de la Isla was one artist who popularized this style. All text is available under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License – Wikipedia

Finally there is the theatrical presentation of flamenco, which uses flamenco technique and music but is closer in presentation to a ballet performance.

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