Tag Archives: Native American

This Is The Place Heritage Park

This Is The Place Heritage Park - Salt Lake City, Utah, Historical Landmark, Pioneer Villages, LDS, Latter Day Saint History, Family, Park, Children't Activities, Pet Farms, HolidayThe West…just as it was! Step back in time with a visit to This Is The Place Heritage Park. The non-profit This Is The Place Foundation manages Utah’s premier living history attraction, our historic 450-acre Utah state Park. Our mission is to preserve and promote the heritage and history of Utah. You’ll find it alive in storied accounts of the settlement of the West, told by our knowledgeable interpreters in a setting of original and replica historic homes. You’ll also see artisans and interpreters demonstrate 19th Century frontier life in a working environment. While you look on, the blacksmith explains his trade while he creates items used elsewhere in the Village and the furniture-maker turns ordinary wood into a masterpiece!

This Is The Place Heritage Park Pioneer Games, Salt Lake City, Utah, LDS, Latter Day Saint History

A lively variety of domestic skills are demonstrated in Village homes. You can watch wool being carded and spun into yarn that will be colored with a kaleidoscope of dyes made from native plants, many grown right here at the Park. At another historic building, candles are being dipped layer-by-layer over a small open fire in the back yard and quilting demonstrations are sure to leave you warm at heart!

A visit to the Park is not a tour of historic artifacts behind velvet ropes and glass, but a true experience of life as it was in the early days of the West. The Native American Village offers a window to a world long since gone, where members of Utah’s indigenous tribes interpret the history of their native people. You can also enjoy the Park from the comfort of one of our three replica trains and see and hear the history of the settlement, or simply spend the day walking the quiet streets on your own.

This Is The Place Heritage Park Train Rides, Tours, Pioneer VillageElsewhere in the 450-acre Park is our Visitors’ Center, the welcome center of the Park. There you’ll find one of our newest attractions, the Heritage Park Preview exhibition, along with one of Utah’s finest gift and souvenir shops. The ZCMI Mercantile inside the Park is filled with old-fashioned gifts and candy and is sure to be one of your most memorable shopping experiences during your visit.

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The monument on the plaza with the 60-ft- high “This Is The Place Monument,” the statuary walk culminating at the National Pony Express Monument and plenty of native flora and fauna to enjoy and/or photograph offers you more to do than a single day allows! And no visit is complete without a trip to the Huntsman Hotel where you’ll find some of the best homemade food in the West! The hand-cut, fresh potato fries are a Park favorite! So come prepared to spend an hour or a few days with us at the West’s premier living history attraction, This Is The Place!

Admissions: Adults $5.00,  Children (3-11) $3.00, Seniors (55+) $3.00

Hours: 10am-5pm Monday – Saturday, 11am-4pm Sunday (Winter Season November-April)

This is the Place Heritage Park
2601 East Sunnyside Ave
Salt Lake City, UT 84108-1453 (801) 582-1847

Nuchu: Voices of the Ute People

Nuchu-Voices-of-the-Ute-People,-Native-American,-Museum-of-Peoples-and-Culture,-BYUThe BYU Museum of Peoples and Cultures is pleased to announce their newest exhibit, “Nuchu: Voices of the Ute People.”

The exhibit celebrates the rich heritage of the Ute throughout northeastern Utah, including Utah Valley. In the exhibit, their voices tell the story of their vibrant history and life.

The exhibit contains items collected around the Vernal area of Utah during the 1930s and 1940s. The text and labels for this exhibit are taken from interviews with Ute tribal members over the past 15 years, providing an opportunity to hear how the Ute view the items and their own heritage. Helping to fulfil the MPC’s mission to train future museum professionals, “students have combed through hours of interviews and texts, collaborated on the design of the galleries, and built the displays,” Kari Nelson, curator of education, said.

Museum of Peoples and Cultures
Brigham Young University
700 North 100 East, Provo, Utah
(801) 422-0020

Utah History “The History of Utah”

1200

At the time of European expansion, beginning with Spanish explorers traveling from Mexico, five distinct native peoples occupied territory within the Utah area: the Northern Shoshone, the Goshute, the Ute, the Paiute and the Navajo.

1540

The Spanish explorer Francisco Vásquez de Coronado may have crossed into what is now southern Utah in 1540, when he was seeking the legendary Cíbola.

1776

A group led by two Spanish Catholic priests—sometimes called the Dominguez-Escalante Expedition—left Santa Fe in 1776, hoping to find a route to the California coast. The expedition traveled as far north as Utah Lake and encountered the native residents.

1803

The Louisiana Purchase was the acquisition by the United States of America in 1803 of 828,000 square miles (2,144,000 square kilometers or 529,920,000 acres) of France’s claim to the territory of Louisiana.

1804 – 1806

The Lewis and Clark Expedition, also known as the Corps of Discovery Expedition, was the first American expedition to cross what is now the western portion of the United States, departing in May 1804, from near St. Louis on the Mississippi River, making their way westward through the continental divide to the Pacific coast.

1822

The Rocky Mountain Fur Company sometimes called Ashley’s Hundred, was organized in St. Louis, Missouri in 1822 by William Henry Ashley and Andrew Henry. Among the employees was Jedediah Smith, who went on to take a leading role in the company’s operations.  The company became a pioneer in western exploration, most notably in the Green River Valley. The operations of other aspiring organizations like the American Fur Company would often overlap, causing a fierce rivalry. Growing competition motivated the trappers to explore and head deeper into the wilderness. Effectively, this led to greater knowledge of the topography and to great reductions in the beaver populations.

1825

Early mountain men and fur trappers including Jim Bridger, Kit Carson and Jedediah Smith begin to map and explore the area now known as Utah. The city of Provo was named for one such man, Étienne Provost, who visited the area in 1825. The city of Ogden, Utah is named for a brigade leader of the Hudson’s Bay Company, Peter Skene Ogden who trapped in the Weber Valley.

1830

Indian Removal Act of 1830

1846

One year before the arrival of the Mormons, the ill-fated Donner party crossed through the Salt Lake valley late in the season, deciding not to winter there but to continue forward to California.

1846 – 1847

Mexican–American War was an armed conflict between the United States and the Centralist Republic of Mexico (which became the Second Federal Republic of Mexico during the war) from 1846 to 1848. It followed in the wake of the 1845 U.S. annexation of Texas, which Mexico considered part of its territory, despite the 1836 Texas Revolution.

1847

Latter Day Saint’s (The Mormon’s) begin to settle Utah

1850

Donation Land Claim Act of 1850 allowed settlers to claim land in the Oregon Territory, then including the modern states of Washington, Oregon, Idaho and parts of Wyoming. Settlers were able to claim 320 or 640 acres of land for free between 1850 and 1854, and then at a cost of $1.25 per acres until the law expired in 1855.

1861 – 1865 

American Civil War

1862

Homestead Act of 1862 The homestead was an area of public land in the West (usually 160 acres or 0.64 km2) granted to any US citizen willing to settle on and farm the land for at least five years.

1869

Completion of First Transcontinental Railroad May 10, 1869 with the ceremonial driving of the “Last Spike” (later often called the “Golden Spike”) with a silver hammer at Promontory Summit, Utah.

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History of Utah Videos


This video discusses the Fremont people and their culture. Learn about the rock art, artifacts, and mysteries they left behind. You will also discover the many recreational resources and outdoors opportunities available to the entire family.

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Utah History Resources

Utah Digital Newspapers

Fremont Indian State Park & Museum

3820 W Clear Creek Canyon Road
Sevier, UT 84766  (435) 527-4631

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This video discusses the Fremont people and their culture. Learn about the rock art, artifacts, and mysteries they left behind. You will also discover the many recreational resources and outdoors opportunities available to the entire family.

Fremont Indian State Park & Museum Official Website 
3820 W Clear Creek Canyon Road
Sevier, UT 84766  (435) 527-4631